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View Full Version : Anyone with an Electric water pump?


Dave B.
08-02-2005, 01:11 AM
I was thinking of installing one of the Electric water pumps, I was told they were very reliable, then someone told me they were only good for 1000 hours

I was also told some had failed,,,,,,but you know how these stories get around,,,,,I would like to know from those who have them ,,,,,or do you know someone with one,,,,is there more than one kind? is one better than the others??? are they just too scary for the street? I never race at the track, and Im not going to,

Are they a bad idea for a street car, tricked out but a daily driver, i want to be able to go on a trip without worring if im going to blow up.

InfamousSVT
08-02-2005, 03:51 AM
I've heard good things and bad things about them.

The stock water pump, pumps 40gpm and the electric ones pump around 55gpm, plus you will gain around 10rwhp........but I'm not sure that it's actually worth the money for the electric water pump.

I've also heard really good things about the Evans system.
They are in the process of creating a radiator for our cars (03/04) and have a machanical water pump that will pump 100gpm, which is really good. The only thing I think would turn people away is the relocation of the oil filter, which is no big deal to me, but I will be going with there kit soon.

The number one reason these engines fail is due to heat! You can push as much horsepower as you'd like, but without keeping the heat down you won't be enjoying the power for long.

Take a look at the Evans site and send them an email, they are happy to answer any questions you have. http://www.evanscooling.com/main21.htm

Good luck! :thumbsup:

blk04cobra1
08-02-2005, 09:42 AM
we wired my stock pump like an electric one, so i can turn it on with the flip of a switch...i'll be upgrading to the meizer soon...

Dave B.
08-03-2005, 01:18 AM
You mean you wired your Intercooler electric coolant pump up to a switch right?
What were talking about is replacing the belt driven engine coolant pump that robs HP from its drag.

If I were to use an electric pump, the first thing I would do is cut off that white plug on the and of the pumps wire lead, I would then solder large gauge wire directly on the end enclosing each wire separatly with that platic wire protectant wrap, then I would be very anal about the route that wiring takes through out the engine bay and to secure it so as not to have or cause any type of short,

I would not use a fuse or a relay as both of those items can fail, its stupid to worry about using a fuse to protect a $350 eletric motor and end up over heating a $10,000 4.6 Ltr Modular one.

I have seen fuses get old, beat to death by heat and vibration, my safty device would be separate insulation of each wire, then instead of a relay I would simply hook it to the cars ignition switch, when the ignitions on, so is the pump.

Then i would actualy run a totaly separate positive and negitive wire set from a stand by switch inside the car and run it a totaly diferant way through the engine bay right to the pump and solder it as close to the electric motor its self, just in case the main wiring was compromised.

this would be a back up circuit that can be manualy activated should the main wiring fail, ,,I like being prepaired,,

My concern is the life span of the electric motor,,,,,thats what worries me,,anyone know anything about that small issue???? :bounce: :bounce:

flynfink
08-03-2005, 01:20 PM
What were talking about is replacing the belt driven engine coolant pump that robs HP from its drag.

I would not use a fuse or a relay as both of those items can fail, its stupid to worry about using a fuse to protect a $350 eletric motor and end up over heating a $10,000 4.6 Ltr Modular one.

I have seen fuses get old, beat to death by heat and vibration, my safty device would be separate insulation of each wire, then instead of a relay I would simply hook it to the cars ignition switch, when the ignitions on, so is the pump.

You would be an IDIOT :mad: not to have a fuse, unless you want to risk BURNING your car to the ground. This needs to be located as close to the battery as possible....What if the motor shorts.......?????? Also, a relay is needed, so you can run LOW Current wiring into the cockpit to turn the pump on with the ignition switch and possibly a bypass switch to keep the coolant flowing for a while after you shut the engine down.


You certainly aren't an electrician or electrical engineer so don't give advise about something you obviously know nothing about..
Also, you won't gain as much HP as you think, the alternator needs to produce more juice to run the electric motor, so you're net HP gain isn't what you think.

Automakers went to electric fans for two reasons, one, not running unless you need it, two, transverse mounted engines in FWD cars.

Dave B.
08-04-2005, 12:09 AM
I must tell you FLYNFINK or what ever your name is, I am not only an electrical engineer, (IT&T) but I am also a former airline pilot, a Captian with Province Town Boston Airlines from back in the 80's

I give you the fact that yea, I did not think about the car burning up, but it is possible to take wiring such a the positive line that will run from the ignition switch and encase it inside antiwear plastic wire tubbing thats then held closed with wire ties, would I use it without a fuse?? yea I think I would if I wired it, because I know how to run wiring without the possibility of any shorts, a wire shorting that could cause a fire is wiring that rubbed on something long enough to wear the rubber of the copper, yea an idiot would make that kind of mistake, not me, ,,,,I guess I would not be honest in saying theres most likley a safe way to use a fuse though, it would just have to be placed some where there would not be so much vibration, Iv seen a couple of fuses that came apart from age, theres not an aircraft made anymore that uses them, everything is circuit breakers

KCCobra03
08-04-2005, 09:51 AM
My $.02 is that I would put in the fuse, a larger amperage one, and use a relay. Carry a spare fuse with you? You are going to be aware of any overheating when it occurs if a fuse or relay has gone bad. The gauge will tell you. What about when the pump goes out and your not close to home? The relay is going to take the amperage load off the small gauged wires going to your ignition column. If these wires get hot from amperage then you will be replacing it or possibly the Ignition cylinder, Steering column, wiring harness to the car. Not worth that risk to me. Relays are reliable, hell use a heavy direct switch as back up if you don't trust these things, but I would use a fuse from battery to load.

spitfire
08-04-2005, 12:28 PM
OK my$.02 worth! I am not an electrician, but I have been working on Turbines for the past 17 years. We have the same thinking about fuses for our emergency DC lube oil pumps! We would rather burn up a $1000.00 pump rather then a 2 million dollar turbine. But we also have monitoring to have alarms if the pump fails.

With that, on my car if I was to install this electric pump, I would install a fuse with the correct rating at the the battery. And wire an LED at the pump and every time the pump is on a little LED on my dash would be on. I don't think it would be safe to use anything without a fuse or circuit breaker.

Currently my car is at 480hp at the wheels and 542 torque at the wheels. I don't think I will consider installing the pump, unless I plan on going higher in the future. But I am considering changing the intercooler for a higher capacity one. :thumbsup:

Dave B.
08-04-2005, 04:24 PM
I would recommend the Gordsford Heat exchanger mines great, fits well and looks very well made,

On the Fuse and LED issue I thought about wiring it so if the fuse was blown the LED would not be on, but then I knew I would drive around staring at the light rather than traffic, I also thought of using a relay with the back up wiring hooked to it in the configuration that the relay is held in the open possition while the fuse is in tact, but when the fues blew the relay would close thus providing power through the back up wire set to the pump, however if the failure fuse is in the electric motor its self, then Im sending power right back to what made the fuse blow to start with.

When I think of it all that way 11 HP hardly seems worth it, ,Speaking of Turbines I used to fly the EMB-110 Bandit, twin 750 SHP pratts PT-6's
Great engines but the plane was a Brazillian built peice of SH&*

Some of these guys think there engine parts are expensive, why dont you tell them the costs of just what one (1) 747 main power turbine blade cost,,,just one blade?? tell them what it cost to overhaul one 747 engine?

flynfink
08-05-2005, 10:12 AM
I must tell you FLYNFINK or what ever your name is, I am not only an electrical engineer, (IT&T) but I am also a former airline pilot, a Captian with Province Town Boston Airlines from back in the 80's

I give you the fact that yea, I did not think about the car burning up, but it is possible to take wiring such a the positive line that will run from the ignition switch and encase it inside antiwear plastic wire tubbing thats then held closed with wire ties, would I use it without a fuse?? yea I think I would if I wired it, because I know how to run wiring without the possibility of any shorts, a wire shorting that could cause a fire is wiring that rubbed on something long enough to wear the rubber of the copper, yea an idiot would make that kind of mistake, not me, ,,,,I guess I would not be honest in saying theres most likley a safe way to use a fuse though, it would just have to be placed some where there would not be so much vibration, Iv seen a couple of fuses that came apart from age, theres not an aircraft made anymore that uses them, everything is circuit breakers

Names in the sig.

Well, I don't care who or what you claim to be.. I do know that, no matter what you do, if you don't have some sort of safety device (fuse, CB, fusable link) and if the motor shorts, you're gonna watch the cobra burn to the ground. Plain and simple..I do work with industrial electricity and high voltage/hp electric motors on a daily basis.

If that's what you want to do with your car, fine, but please don't give bad advise, especially to people without much knowledge of electricity or electrical safety.

And WTF does being an airline pilot have to do with electrical engineering or electrical safety??? Yoy fly em, not fix em...

Dave B.
08-05-2005, 10:01 PM
GEE,,,,,,,Im sorry,,,,,,I gave most people on this board a lot of credit for having knowledge,,,,,,maybe you should speak for your self, just because there is an electrical short does not mean the whole car burns to the ground,

And I dont know what your getting so puffy about, I simply stated the way I would do it, the people on this board are smart enough to know what they would and would not do,

YOU SIR THEN TOOK IT UPON YOUR SELF TO CALL ME AN IDIOT,,,,,MAYBE YOU SHOULD WATCH WHO YOU INSULT NEXT TIME, :mad: :mad:

flynfink
08-05-2005, 10:38 PM
my last word on this topic...

the gauge wire and the amperage an large electric motor will draw, will, if shorted, weld things.. Ask some of the stereo guys with the large Amps, if they would ever consider putting in a system w/o overload protection. That would be idiotic. I did not call you an idiot. (Re-read my post)

But, If the shoe fits,....

Dave B.
08-05-2005, 10:52 PM
My whole entire point with saying I would not use a fuse,,,,,,was the mear fact, that it seemed silly to use a fuse to protect a $300 electric motor and overheat a $10,000 engine,,,,that was my point,,,,,should there be some type of circuit protection?? yes,,,,,should it be a cheap 25 cent fuse,,,,,no.

Perhaps a circuit breaker inside the cabin with an LED light next to indicating the breaker has not cycled,,,,,,I also said maybe a fuse/relay configuration should be set up in such a way so when the fuse broke, it would close a relay sending power to the pump via a second totally separate set of wires, (yes i know how to do that)

Bottom line,,,,,,,,,,,its all to dam much trouble for 11 HP, when I was riding high perforamce sport bikes, there was a rule of thumb that some Dyno guys came up with playing around with a Dyno, that on a motorcycle, the human body for the most part give or take cannot tell anything less that 6 HP,,,,,what they mean is if an engine was putting out 150 HP and then it made 156 HP the average person could not tell the differance,,,,Now I bet in a car that number much higher, its has to be,,,

So 11 HP,,,,,,,if your not racing ,,,and im not,,,,,,I dont think 11 HP is worth it anymore ,,,,,,