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View Full Version : Changing Pads On 4 Piston Brembo's


tomsgarage
02-01-2006, 09:12 AM
I am getting my car ready for CMP, and I have a question about changing the pads on 4 Piston Brembo's. I installed them this past summer and they are great! I am getting ready to install new pads and rotors, and the instuction manual that came with the kit does not give instruction on how to change the pads?

Thanks in advance!

Hazman
02-01-2006, 11:00 AM
This is how I do mine.

First you need to use two screwdrivers to leverage between the old pads and the rotors to slowly press the pistons back in to the calipers until they are completely seated.
Then usiing a small punch knock out the two pins that run across the top of the pads.
Then you remove the flat retention spring and pull out the old pads.

Now slide the new pads in then place one of the pins back in and tap it from the rear with a hammer to seat it.
Then slip the flat retention spring under that pin and hold it down while you slide the other pin into place and then tap it with the hammer to seat it.

You are done!:thumbsup:

beerkat
02-02-2006, 09:18 AM
Thanks Rick I am about to change my pads for the first time also. Tom you need new rotors already?

tomsgarage
02-03-2006, 03:01 PM
Thanks Rick!

Beerkat, I have not worn the rotors out yet, but when we were in Nashville I had a vibration in the left front of the car under heavy braking. Thought it might be the tire, came in and swapped left sides front to back and still had the vibration after the second run. Went back out on the third run and the vibration went away??? So I thought it might be a rotor warping, and since I already have another set of rotors ready to go (solid/not vented) I might put them on for CMP.

MidLifeC
02-05-2006, 04:14 PM
An easy method to start compressing the pistons is grab the bottom of the rotor and push/pull in and out (within reason).

Hazman
02-05-2006, 05:59 PM
I had forgotten that one thanks!:thumbsup:

beerkat
02-06-2006, 07:59 AM
I changed my pads yesterday and it is the easiest ones I have done.:thumbsup: I thank you for the tips.

tomsgarage
02-08-2006, 08:47 AM
Changed the pads yesterday, worked like a charm, and easiest pads I have ever changed. She is about ready to go to CMP, just have to change brake fluid and she is ready to watch Beerkat spin again!! :D

flynfink
02-08-2006, 10:02 AM
This is how I do mine.

First you need to use two screwdrivers to leverage between the old pads and the rotors to slowly press the pistons back in to the calipers until they are completely seated.
:


Be careful when doing this, you can get the pistons cocked in the bore and damage them or the seals.

There is a very nice, inexpensive tool for doing this available from most automotive parts stores..

Also, sometimes I've used a pair of c-clamps and a large flat wrench to make sure the pistons go straight into the bores.

Hazman
02-08-2006, 04:37 PM
Be careful when doing this, you can get the pistons cocked in the bore and damage them or the seals.

There is a very nice, inexpensive tool for doing this available from most automotive parts stores..

Also, sometimes I've used a pair of c-clamps and a large flat wrench to make sure the pistons go straight into the bores.
The c-clamp or brake piston tools will not work on Brembo calipers. The Brembos are a fixed caliper which is secured rigidly to the axle assembly and has four opposing pistons that force the pads against the disc. A sliding or floating caliper has pistons on only one side of the disc. Therefore, when the caliper acts, it must slide or float in order to bring the pad on the opposite side in contact with the disc. Nearly all original equipment calipers are of the floating type. In a system with fixed calipers, not only is the mounting much more rigid, but the stiffness of the caliper itself is greatly increased. This manifests itself in enhanced braking performance, pedal feel, and pad wear.

One other advantage of the Brembo calipers is that you do not remove the calipers to change the brake pads. They slide in almost like putting toast in a toaster. There is no way to get a tool / clamp inside since the rotor is still there. These two methods (screwdriver and pulling on the rotor) are the only two methods I have seen anyone use with Brembos.

flynfink
02-08-2006, 05:18 PM
the brembo's on my Ducati's are 4 piston fixed units..

Good info Rick, my bad.. :doh2:

tomsgarage
02-09-2006, 09:59 AM
Good info on this thread! Thanks for your replys.

Now another question, what is everyones thoughts on turning the rotors? Should you do it every time you change the pads, or not?

Thanks!

Hazman
02-09-2006, 04:34 PM
If the rotors are fairly smooth and I am putting on the same type of pad I removed I do nothing to the rotors.

If the rotors are fairly smooth and I am changing the type of pad I will sand the rotors with a fine grit for metal sandpaper using my small hand sander.

If the rotors are grooved then have them turned.

I have one set of rotors for street pads and one set for track pads and I just switch them out. The street rotors are my backups when I go to the track. As for turning them usually mine are so heat checked that they cannot be turned anyway.:rolleyes:

Hope that helps.

beerkat
02-10-2006, 09:00 AM
I agree with Rick. I do not turn my rotors at all. You lose metal when they are turn so the rotor looses some of it's ability to dissipate heat. also you might need to use shims with your pads to make sure they clamp like they should.