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93Hatch
08-30-2007, 08:10 PM
It has been ages since I've posted on here. :D

I'm thinking about possibly meeting up for a track meet.

Saying that, the only mods to my GT is a borla catback, K&N FIPK, and a Steeda Tri-Ax.

So moving along to the track thing...what would be a good brake pad for my stock rotors? Obviously the stock setup really stinks, one hard brake push and it totally fades into oblivion.

What would you do to solve this?

jimmysidecarr
08-30-2007, 09:17 PM
Fresh brake fluid 3 or 4 days before the event...
Fresh ... or at least 3/4 left HP+(Hawk) or similar pads up front ...
Fresh ... or at least 3/4 left HPs...(A step down from the front compound)(Hawk) or similar pads out back ...
Make sure they are well bedded in before the event... (google bedding in pads and rotors)...
btw save your old pads to put back on and use up after the event or keep as spares.

Fresh oil change...
Good tires with a good amount of tread... Z,W, or Y speed rated preferred.(bring a tire pressure gauge)
Snell SA 2000 or newer helmet...

That's it assuming the car is tight and not worn out.

Lots of mods not required... You will be learning rapidly and having a ball!!!

We call the first few events ..... "The Driver Mod"

You will love it!!!
Save your money for tires, fuel and brake pads...

The first true mod I would consider would be brake cooling ducts... but it's not needed in the beginning, unless you have prior autocross or competition experience.

BIG BUCKS NOT REQUIRED :thumbsup:

This Open Track Pimer link is a great read.. and very helpful...

http://www.norcal-saac.org/ot/primer.pdf

..

93Hatch
08-30-2007, 09:27 PM
Thanks for the tips!

I may pull the fogs and put in ducts. I used to do a lot of autocrossing in my old honda civic, but the brakes were good for that.

I'll see what I can find on some ducts.

Thanks for the great info!

93KingCobra
08-30-2007, 11:06 PM
Can always count on Jimmy...... :thumbsup:

UFO
08-30-2007, 11:44 PM
Obviously heat is your biggest problem with the smaller GT rotors so brake ducting, SS brake lines and higher temp fluid are a good start along with the correct pads. I have no clue what works well with Mustangs so listen to Jimmy :).

93Hatch
08-31-2007, 09:42 AM
Also I had another quick question. Rotors. I am needing some new rotors, and I'm debating on stock replacements or going with something like a powerslot.

You guys would know best on this, so I reserve this for you all!

I've heard negative things about powerslots (or similar rotors), but you all most likely tried that route before, or know someone who has.

97CasperCobra
08-31-2007, 09:54 AM
Mark, I would stick with the stock rotors for now. As with David said, I'd also replace the brake fluid and upgrade to SS lines. For the event in Nov, I'll be running the performance friction pads from Vato Zone, possibly upgrading to '00R Brembos by this time next year.

Since it is your first track event, the main goal should be to go out, have fun, learn a LOT and not break the bank. Hope this helps man and hope to see you out there....:thumbsup:

UFO
08-31-2007, 02:46 PM
Also I had another quick question. Rotors. I am needing some new rotors, and I'm debating on stock replacements or going with something like a powerslot.

You guys would know best on this, so I reserve this for you all!

I've heard negative things about powerslots (or similar rotors), but you all most likely tried that route before, or know someone who has.Personally, I dislike slotted rotors. Slotted rotors will reduce the life of your pad and increase dusting while not giving you much benefit. Two of the 'benefits' for slotted are gas dispersal and heat dispersal. Modern brake pads, generally, don't gas (gassing is chemicals in the compound of the pad releasing when under extreme heat) so that's kind of a moot point and the heat dispersion aspect is, well, debatable at best. I think you'll be just as happy with some Brembo blanks.

jimmysidecarr
08-31-2007, 06:45 PM
If you MUST buy rotors... I would get the normal GT OEM style cheapies from where ever...

Rotors are expendables like fuel, pads and tires... they need to be affordable...

If you know you like doing this sort of thing a Cobra(PBR 2 piston caliper) brake upgrade may be worth doing.

If you REALLY GET HOOKED(like me).... :p You may want the 2000 Cobra R Brembo upgrade... however you will still need to upgrade the rears to the standard Cobra set up.

It's only money...LOL!!! ;) :D

93Hatch
08-31-2007, 09:52 PM
If you MUST buy rotors... I would get the normal GT OEM style cheapies from where ever...

Rotors are expendables like fuel, pads and tires... they need to be affordable...

If you know you like doing this sort of thing a Cobra(PBR 2 piston caliper) brake upgrade may be worth doing.

If you REALLY GET HOOKED(like me).... :p You may want the 2000 Cobra R Brembo upgrade... however you will still need to upgrade the rears to the standard Cobra set up.

It's only money...LOL!!! ;) :D

haha I hope I don't get too over my head. I'm actually going to need to take a day off to make the Nov meet. It is all good, I'll keep it simple for now. :D

Thanks for you help everyone :thumbsup:

Admiral
09-01-2007, 08:21 AM
I recommend you bed the new pads (if you do buy new pads) on the old rotors first, then put on new rotors. If you have time, season the new rotors on old pads first, then put them on the car. A bit of a PITA but worth it. In my experience putting on new rotors AND new pads (even if you try and bed this combo of new parts) results in excessive pad wear and reduced braking force.

http://www.shotimes.com/brakes/part1.html

Again, the key phrase here is 'gentle heat cycling'. If you go to the trouble and expense to put on new pads and rotors and then go out and immediately HAMMER the brakes, you're wasting your time and money.

http://www.afcoracing.com/tech_pages/pad_term.shtml

BEDDING YOUR ROTORS AND PADS
First, slowly build heat into the pads by making slow to medium speed stops. Then make a series of very hard high-speed stops. Some fade may be experienced when doing the high-speed stops. The brakes should not be dragged during this procedure. Let the brakes cool down for twenty minutes or more and they are then ready to race. Never use new pads to bed new rotors. It is best to bed new pads on old rotors that had run the same type of pads. It is best to bed new rotors with old pads that are the type that will be used in the race. A bedded rotor should have a uniform, polished appearance with no cracks or grooves.

jimmysidecarr
09-01-2007, 11:50 PM
I recommend you bed the new pads (if you do buy new pads) on the old rotors first, then put on new rotors. If you have time, season the new rotors on old pads first, then put them on the car. A bit of a PITA but worth it. In my experience putting on new rotors AND new pads (even if you try and bed this combo of new parts) results in excessive pad wear and reduced braking force.

http://www.shotimes.com/brakes/part1.html



http://www.afcoracing.com/tech_pages/pad_term.shtml


Mike is right!!!

The bedding in correctly is the key to minimizing your brake expenses and maximizing you track experience!!!

New rotors???? Season with old pads.
New Pads??? Bed with old rotors.

Sound like a lot of extra work but believe me it is worth it!!!

93Hatch
09-03-2007, 09:07 AM
Mike is right!!!

The bedding in correctly is the key to minimizing your brake expenses and maximizing you track experience!!!

New rotors???? Season with old pads.
New Pads??? Bed with old rotors.

Sound like a lot of extra work but believe me it is worth it!!!


It may be worth it...I'm also thinking about upgrading the items around the brakes, like to an '03-'04 cobra. Details to come if this becomes a reality. :D