PDA

View Full Version : coolant in exhaust


b99j
04-09-2008, 09:13 PM
Need some good direction on why I have coolant in my exhaust. Put a X pipe on my 99 cobra and noticed coolant in the drivers side H pipe. About a teaspoon. I do not have any overheating problems. I do notice I lose coolant over a period of time. Also some coolant leakage around the coolant tank. Car has 38,000 miles on it. A while back I had Ford dealer put in a new tank think it was leaking, but now I know it is leaking into exhaust. Could this be a head gasket or intake manifold gasket? Other thing I have noticed is when I back into my driveway (slight incline) I get a wiff of smoke, oil burn off. Is this part of same problem? Any suggestions would be appreciated, Thanks:) Bruce.

cobrabitn
04-10-2008, 10:43 PM
Could be a head gasket and most likely is but you may want to see if your coolant is bubbling or if it smells of exhaust first. Really hard to diagnose but what has been done to the car?

blueblazes
04-10-2008, 11:02 PM
could be intake or head, a mechanic friend of mine used to have this thing he could take a sample of coolant add something to it and it would show if there was something in the coolant that could only come from head gasket leaking like exhaust or something to be honest I dont know what it was

red04svtcobra
04-11-2008, 03:57 AM
If the coolant in the radiator is bubbling then you have a blown head gasket.

jlg32281
04-11-2008, 11:36 AM
Probably a blown head gasket. There is a super easy, fast, and cheap test for this. Go to autozone and rent a block tester, it's free. they make you put down a deposit so you'll bring it back, but it's free. You will have to buy a bottle of the solution that goes in the tool. It's like $7 and it is enough to do about 10 test, it's good to have around. Follow the instructions on the tool and in about 1min, you'll know if you have a bad head gasket. It test for exhaust gases in the coolant. It's super easy and it works well. I hope it's just a head gasket and not a cracked head. Head gaskets are not that bad of a job. Just make sure you don't reuse the stock head bolts, they are not reusable, they stretch. The best thing to do is replace them with ARP bolts, they're reusable and will give a more acurate torque reading. Good luck, keep us posted.

b99j
04-11-2008, 09:13 PM
OK, I will go to autozone and do the test. Will keep you posted. Thanks for the advice.

98 Yellow Snake
04-13-2008, 07:31 PM
I recently went through this same problem. I had to have the engine pulled and the head gaskets replaced. Might want to have the water pump replaced while the engine is pulled. Just a suggestion.

jlg32281
04-13-2008, 10:36 PM
You don't have to pull the motor to do a head gasket job, but it is a big job. Depending on the mileage of the car, it might be a good time to go ahead and pull it and rebuild. You will have to pull off almost everything that you have to pull off to pull the motor anyways. The bottom end of the engine doesn't have many sensors or anything running to it. What I'm saying is that by the time you're ready to pull the head, really all you have to do is undo the motor mounts and lift it out of there. If it were my car, I would pull it and rebuild. Replacing the water pump is always a good idea when doing a head gasket job. Keep us posted.

ProfChaos
04-17-2008, 01:44 AM
You don't have to pull the motor to do a head gasket job, but it is a big job. Depending on the mileage of the car, it might be a good time to go ahead and pull it and rebuild. You will have to pull off almost everything that you have to pull off to pull the motor anyways. The bottom end of the engine doesn't have many sensors or anything running to it. What I'm saying is that by the time you're ready to pull the head, really all you have to do is undo the motor mounts and lift it out of there. If it were my car, I would pull it and rebuild. Replacing the water pump is always a good idea when doing a head gasket job. Keep us posted.


The Haynes Manual for the 1994-2003 Mustang claims that a cylinder head for the V-8 engine can be removed without also removing the engine, but a highly reputable modular engine specialist tells me that this is actually not the case with the DOHC Cobra engine. He claims that it is necessary to drop the K-member so that there is room to work, especially if there are after-market headers.

Dropping the K-member while raising the car is the preferred method for many modular engine specialists, and--judging from the way that the Cobra engine is wedged in there--I can't say that I blame them. Some modular engine specialists also remove the Cobra engine by removing the transmission and then pulling the engine in a more conventional manner, but it seems to me that the only reason that they do this is to save rack-space, since pulling the engine in this manner allows them to push the car out of the way and not have an entire K-member sitting in the floor space of their garage. (Space sometimes translates to money for the automotive repair shop when a big job is in progress.) And, either dropping the K-member or pulling the engine in a more conventional manner after removing the transmission is a very big job.

Thus, jlg32281 makes a good point about shot-gunning the process and having the engine rebuilt while you are at it: It is likely going to be somewhere around $1500 to have the engine dropped and re-installed--including the head gasket replacement--, and it is only another $700 to have both heads rebuilt (at Clearwater Cylinder Head). Throw in another $500+parts for new rod bearings, main bearings, piston rings and cylinder-honing, and you have a completely rebuilt engine.

It's easy to spend someone else's money, I realize. :D Even so, I've traveled a winding-and-expensive road when it comes to Cobra engine rebuilds, and it seems to me that it is often better to take the beating all at once, instead of having to go through a rebuild in several very expensive phases. For example, the business who brokered the initial rebuild of my Cobra engine went belly-up right after my engine rebuild was finished (last month), so their twelve-month/12,000-mile warranty is effectively voided. Consequently, because there is a defective casting on one of the rebuilt cylinder heads (causing oil starvation to the head), I now have to pay an additional $1800-plus for parts and labor to finish a job that wasn't fully executed in the first place. In the long run, it can often be less expensive to take all the pain in a few sharp blows, instead of having to pay big money for labor in more than one phase.

Lastly, if you do decide to have the engine rebuilt, I highly recommend that you get a referral from someone you trust (or from the Forum here) and then have the work done only by a highly recommended modular engine specialist. Otherwise, you might be asking for big, big trouble: rebuilding DOHC Cobra engines is "not for sissies," and the average mechanic down the street might inadvertently deal a lethal blow to the engine, out of ignorance at dealing with DOHC modular engines. For example, an otherwise-qualified mechanic who is not a modular engine specialist might not know that the "stock 4.6-liter engine uses a powdered-metal rod with a cracked cap, [and that] the unique surfaces created when the cap is cracked and separated from the rod...means [that] each cap must remain with the connecting rod it came from, for the life of the rod"
(Sean Hyland) (http://www.mre-books.com/sa82/sa82_3.html).

Best wishes, whatever you decide. :cheers:

--Professor Chaos

jlg32281
04-18-2008, 01:53 PM
Rebuil it!