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BOOMER23
08-27-2003, 01:22 AM
I have got some really bad waterspots on my car that I can't seem to shake to save my life, I have heard that using well water when washing the car is a bad thing but I am kinda cornered into it. I used to have a white V6 mustang and never noticed any of these spots when I was washing it but I dont know if its cause my red cobra just shows it more or if the well water had something to do with it because I used to wash the V6 at a local do it yourself car wash but when we got a new well punched due to a lack of water, I had access to enough water to wash my car. This was around the time I got the cobra and I dont know if its the color of the car (and Im sure I pay more attention to the cobra than I ever did the V6) or if its the well water. Ill admit I do have a tendency to wash my car on pretty hot days which I have also heard is not really the best time to, but I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions or new practices that I could do to rid myself of this ugly problem and also my dad and I are considering getting the car buffed soon, mainly to get rid of this problem. Still I would like some feedback cause I dont want to get it buffed and looking good only to just haul off and be washing it wrong and have the spots apear again. Thanks for any possible help. I mean I know these things are fast and all but I gotta have it look good also when Im handing all of my friends in rice burners their asses.

Thanks
Ashton

tcrews
08-27-2003, 11:57 AM
Claybar the car and you should get rid of all the waterspots....you'll have to wax/polish the car right after though as the claybar will pretty much remove everything off the paint.

Also do you let your car air-dry or do you dry it off after washing? This will eliminate waterspots from forming in the first place. Wipe it down with 100% cotton towels (to prevent any scratching) or use a California Water-Blade to knock 95% of the water off and then hit it with the 100% cotton towel.

I use a combination of a water blade, the Absorber and 100% cotton towels to dry my car every time I wash it.

STANGBUM
08-27-2003, 12:28 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by tcrews

Also do you let your car air-dry or do you dry it off after washing? This will eliminate waterspots from forming in the first place. Wipe it down with 100% cotton towels (to prevent any scratching) or use a California Water-Blade to knock 95% of the water off and then hit it with the 100% cotton towel.

I use a combination of a water blade, the Absorber and 100% cotton towels to dry my car every time I wash it. [/QUOTEI

I also use Absorber and 100% cotton towel combo. and never let my car air dry, also to lose the water spots on your windows try Zaino Z-12 Clear-View glass polish. I had tried alot of stuff and this took them of with a little bit of elbow grease. great stuff.:thumbsup:

BOOMER23
08-27-2003, 04:17 PM
I do make sure that I dry my car off with a good clean towel but for some reason or another I still have the problem. I think more water has a chance to dry than it should since like I said I tend to wash it on pretty hot days. Tell me a little bit more about the claybar, I've heard a little about it but Im not really very educated on those things, are they like they sound, a bar that you basically rub on the car kinda like you wax a surfboard. Also where would you get these things. It sounds to me, in regards to the zaino on the windows, like I should buy stock in this company, I have yet to try any of their stuff but it sounds like everyone on this board is pretty much sold on thier products. Thanks again guys.


Ashton

tcrews
08-27-2003, 04:55 PM
It's almost exactly like it sounds........you can get them at Pep Boys and probably any other Auto-store (Autozone, Advance). I know you can get them at Pep-boys. It's a bar of clay and usually a spray that you use to keep the area you are working on lubricated so that they claybar glides over the paint and doesn't stick to it. You work in small areas at a time using circular motions with the claybar and it picks up all the crap out of your paint (things that sometimes even look like they are under the clearcoat). To do the entire car takes quite a long time and would be best to do in a cool area and not direct sunlight. You'll have to polish/wax afterwards (wash the car right after claying) as the claybar will remove everything.

Zaino sells a claybar as well....

http://www.zainobros.com/ is their website....excellent stuff.

You'll want some Z1 (pre-lok), Z2 (polish-clearcoat), Z6 (detail spray), Z7 (car wash...love this stuff) and anything else you would like to add (tire dressing, window cleaner, leather cleaner/treatment, etc....).

Steve Treece
09-04-2003, 08:31 AM
To the extent practical, you should avoid washing or applying polish/wax on a hot surface. Move the car to a shaded area and let the surface cool before doing either one of those.

When you wash the car, do you wash the body and then the wheels and tires? Doing it this way will increase the liklihood of water spotting because water will have the opportunity to dry on the car while you're down on the wheels. Reduce the chance for spotting by starting with wheels/tires first. Don't wet down the whole car, just the wheels. Wash the body after you've completed the wheels. This will reduce the amount of time water is laying on the surface. You can also reduce the amount of water to get off the car by taking the nozzle off the hose and letting the water run over the surface...this will produce a sheeting action that leaves less water on the surface for you to remove.

Water spots are often caused by the minerals left after water has evaporated. There are cases where white vinegar will remove the spots since it will dissolve the minerals. You can use it straight or dilute about 50%...the vinegar will not harm your finish. It may be necessary to rub the spots a little to remove them, but the white vinegar is worth a try.

Tcrews also suggested clay bar. Clay is an awesome cleaning tool that will get the surface absolutely clean and slick. Anything left on the surface after claying is etched into the paint and will require the use of an abrasive product for removal. The keys to using clay are keeping the surface well lubricated, use light to medium pressure, and straight line motions. It isn't hard to do, it just takes a little time. Read more about clay bar in the "Tips and Tricks" section at www.zainostore.com.

BlackCoupe
09-04-2003, 09:52 PM
Something else to consider is the amount of washing solution you are using. I have noticed if I use too much, I get soap spots. And I agree with the previous posts: Never wash your car hot or in the direct sun or you will for sure get spots regardless.

94venom
09-05-2003, 03:01 PM
the best thing i have found is the zaino water spot remover....i tested it on one small corner of my rear window, and that is the only part of the glass on my '94 that is without spots. 02ws6 and i used it on my snake...the stuff is wonderful....:smack:

02WS6
09-05-2003, 03:11 PM
Originally posted by 94venom
the best thing i have found is the zaino water spot remover....i tested it on one small corner of my rear window, and that is the only part of the glass on my '94 that is without spots. 02ws6 and i used it on my snake...the stuff is wonderful....:smack:

Yeah the Z-12 works great on glass but don't use it on the paint or the tinted side of the window (if they are tinted..... It will cause horrific swirl marks.

To get the water spots off the paint use a claybar then a good wax to protect the paint. Zanio has all this stuff. Make sure to dry the car with a white cotton towel or an absorber. Don't I repeat don't use a water blade! Esp if you have a dark color paint. Never let a car air dry.... it just a bad idea.

BOOMER23
09-07-2003, 02:35 AM
Im curious about the water blade why do you feel that it is a bad idea? Im just trying to make sure I get this all done right

94venom
09-07-2003, 11:59 PM
I can't speak for 02ws6, but the experiences I have had with one haven't been that good or bad either way. I have found that with a water blade, if there is any type of particulate matter on the paint that for some reason didn't get washed off, it can get trapped on the blade and scratch. That isn't to say that it will happen, but I have had it happen to me.

02WS6
09-08-2003, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by BOOMER23
Im curious about the water blade why do you feel that it is a bad idea? Im just trying to make sure I get this all done right

a water blade is just like a windshield wiper.... It can pick up tiny particles in the edge of the blade and you probly won't even notice them until its too late. The particles WILL scratch your paint... (esp a clearcoat)

Of course this can happen with a towel or an absorber so you really have to take special care of anything that will touch your paint. but to enhance my point... have you ever riden in a car that hasn't had the wipers changed in a while.... Ever notice the scratches on the glass where the wipers go back and forth over the same area..... the water blade can make the same marks in your paint. It is made of a harder material than an absorber or a towel so common sense will tell you that it is more likely to scratch the surface of the paint.

Once again.... this is only my $.02 not the gospel from the show car gods. But if you use it becareful!

BOOMER23
09-08-2003, 06:37 PM
Ahhh I gotcha. Thanks for the heads up guys.

tcrews
09-08-2003, 10:26 PM
A waterblade is pretty far from a windshield wiper blade....

I've used them on black cars, red cars, white cars, blue cars......no scratching/markings period. I usually only dry my car after I wash it so typically there isn't anything on the car that would scratch it :)

I swore against them until I had too many people with incredible paint on their cars tell me how great they are. They work very well and reduce the amount of effort in drying the car.

BOOMER23
09-09-2003, 12:01 AM
I have done a whole lot of research on this whole thing and I have had so many different opinions it has just about made me go crazy. I'll admit that I have gotten a little bit impatient with these waterspots, they absolutely have made my car look like a very uncared for car with an early 90's paintjob instead of a nice fairly glossy finish that should be on a cared for 99. I figured that it couldnt hurt to experiment a little and try some stuff, both techniques and products alike. I did try the white vinegar idea and that did a fairly good job, but I was soon ready to move on to the next try. I gave the car a really thorough wash and the day before had finally bought a california water blade, chammois cloth and a bottle of Zymol cleaner wax. I was determined to get some zaino like everyone says but I read a really good report that said that Zymol did quite a good job as well so I figured what do I have to lose. My father helped an awful lot and we undertook the task of giving the car a really good wax to see if it would take some of them out. It took some really really hard elbow grease but it did wonders for my car. Its not 100% perfect yet but it looks about 40 times better. I think it'll hold me over until I can order some of those God-sent Zaino products I hear about. I really do need the window cleaner cause my windows of course didnt get waxed so they look like you are looking out of a screen door, but so far its well on its way. I really wanted to enter the show at Autofair but I think I may just attend as a spectator. Mainly cause I havent done that engine cleaning that I have been avoiding for a while and I dont want to embarrass myself after seeing some of the entries at the Parkway show a little while back. Im still very new to the car show scene and havent gotten my feet wet yet.

BOOMER23
09-27-2003, 02:27 AM
just a little additional tidbit of info, my father talked to a friend of his in the business of cleaning cars and he menitoned in my area there were a lot of cases of the spots especially on auto glass and that it is actually acid rain and is very very hard to get off. Just thought id add this for anyone who comes along and may have the same problem.

ausie
04-15-2004, 07:58 AM
If the water you are using (which is the case for everybody) has minerals in it, when the water evaporates, the minerals are left behind. Acidic water spots are actually etched spots in the clear coat which may need to be compounded out. More than likely the rings or spots are just minerals left behind after the water evaporates. I read somewhere that using white vinegar can remove water spots. Vinegar is acidic. Also note acidic water is also known as hard water, if you have soft water (more basic) that can leave spots too. Many well systems have water softeners in them which uses sodium based salts to reduce the acidity in the water. When the water dries, the salts are left behind which actually bonds to the paint. I have city water which has lots of bleach in it. Hence the same problem (white spots on a black car). Usually I can remove the spots with detailer spray before waxing. I recently just bought some meguires synthetic wax, (was looking for zaino, will have to order that on-line since there is no local distributor yet). There are many tricks to remove water spots, I would recommend a clay bar over compounding the paint, unless it has lots of scratches in it. I did notice acidic water spots on my ex-wifes car - waxing will not cure that, in fact the wax did not even stick to it. It looked like the clear coat was missing from the paint surface. That was caused by bird droppings being left on the car in the hot sun. Never park under a mulburry tree! If you see lots of spots under a tree on the pavement, do not park there or your paint will look like the road surface. Good luck in removing the spots, more than likely it is just contaminants left over from the water and can be removed without extensive paint refurbishing.

Black Horse
04-16-2004, 08:05 PM
I know it sounds like a fad...but that darn Mr. Clean Autowash system left NO spots on my Black Cobra......and I didn't have to get out of my chair or put down my beer to dry it...... :bounce:

ausie
04-17-2004, 09:05 AM
Does the Mr. Clean car wash have amonia in it? If it does, you could probably do the same thing with windex. I have often used combinations of windex and or glass plus with amonia in the wash water to clean my explorer which worked better than tide without leaving water spots or soap spots on the paint. That method was intended to remove any wax build up prior to a complete compound and poslish of the 8 year old paint. The old beater still shines even when it is covered in dirt.

Thanks for the tip on the Mr. Clean. I was curious how it worked. Now you have my interest in the product. Thanks!