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View Full Version : What's up with these Tom C? (Brisk Plug)


smashedheadcat
07-29-2004, 10:43 AM
Hey Tom, you're the man........ you know anything about all this hype going on about the "Brisk Plugs" that add 10-20 rwhp as tested by strictly performance?? It's all over svtperformance and modularfords and stuff. Just wondered if anyone here expirienced these things. They can be purchased through Strictly Performance, and I don't remember where else. $89 shipped for all 8 of them........ http://www.briskplugs.com/products-lgs.aspx

Josh

tcrews
07-29-2004, 11:39 AM
Hey Tom, you're the man........ you know anything about all this hype going on about the "Brisk Plugs" that add 10-20 rwhp as tested by strictly performance?? It's all over svtperformance and modularfords and stuff. Just wondered if anyone here expirienced these things. They can be purchased through Strictly Performance, and I don't remember where else. $89 shipped for all 8 of them........ http://www.briskplugs.com/products-lgs.aspx

Josh

First I've heard of them....but my thoughts are still.....plugs are plugs, they ignite the fuel and can't ignite it any "better" if the plug is properly gapped and of high quality. $8.00 vs. $90 for spark plugs.....something you throw away each time you swap them out..... just don't see the reason behind spending that kind of money :)

Firme
07-29-2004, 05:36 PM
Two decently respected shops, Strictly performane ( who I have reservations about) and Lightning force performace, both claim they have done extensive testing on the brisk plugs. Both shops claim that they have gained an average of 10hp/tq throughout the range. Strictly reports that their testing is conclusive that the plugs work, where as LFP is still testing, but agrees with Strictly on what they found so far. They have also posted a few dyno graphs showing their gains with no cool down between runs. It seems that the ones benefitting most form these are the forced inductions crowd.

Futhermore, striclty is reporting that the plug team is working with the bush car team with these plugs and that higher power cars are getting upwards of 20rwhp/tq with them

The claims are, that these plugs burn 3-5% more fuel and will raise A/F up .2 (so if you have a 11.8 ratio, it will go to 12) and get more power from less fuel consumption. It is virtually impossible to ignite 100% of your A/F mixture, what these plugs claim to do, is burn more of the mixture, producing more power.

For reference on this, check out this site.
http://www.silverbulletrx7.com/plugs/

When I heard about these, I have to admit, I was intrigued to say the least, but a little sceptical. I mean the theory behind them works on paper.

At the moment, they have hit the scene, and a handful of people from SVT and ModFords, including, unbiased owners like us (meaning they are not a selling dealer) have ordered these, and many are determined to report their finding on these plugs.

I personally am waiting to see what they report.

smashedheadcat
07-29-2004, 07:01 PM
I saw that on the .2 of air to fuel. What I'm wondering, is the extra fuel coming from leaning out the mixture? Say if you richen it back down to 11.8 would the power return to the previous power level? I mean, just tuning the MAF to command a 12.0 a/f as opposed to an 11.8 would show similar gains. I kind of think it's bogus, because another way to burn more fuel in the combustion chamber would be to open up the gap...... provided you don't blow the plug out...... which could be helped by a KB boost a spark. I would also guess that the plug just gives a quick spark to cause combustion, and the combustion itself ignites the rest of the fuel making the spark plug useless after inital "light off". Hell, I don't know....

tcrews
07-29-2004, 07:50 PM
That's a good point....if you tuned your A/F .2 leaner would you make the same gains? Either way...I'm not spending $90.00 on plugs that "might" give me more power and that "might" make my engine run leaner (bad bad thing to do with forced induction). Heck I wouldn't spend $90.00 on plugs period :D

Same type stuff was going around when the Denso Iridium plugs first hit the market....though gains of 5-10 rwhp were thrown around.

I saw that on the .2 of air to fuel. What I'm wondering, is the extra fuel coming from leaning out the mixture? Say if you richen it back down to 11.8 would the power return to the previous power level? I mean, just tuning the MAF to command a 12.0 a/f as opposed to an 11.8 would show similar gains. I kind of think it's bogus, because another way to burn more fuel in the combustion chamber would be to open up the gap...... provided you don't blow the plug out...... which could be helped by a KB boost a spark. I would also guess that the plug just gives a quick spark to cause combustion, and the combustion itself ignites the rest of the fuel making the spark plug useless after inital "light off". Hell, I don't know....

smashedheadcat
07-31-2004, 12:58 AM
Also...... I wonder if people are throwing these in replacing and old tired plug. Heck, wouldn't new plugs replacing some old ones show small gains??

Firme
07-31-2004, 03:13 AM
all valid questions that I wondered myself.

I guess its all theory until someone puts the time in with extensive testing and figurea it out with all the different variables (IE: once it leans, richen it back up and see if the gain goes away)


But like tom said, $90 is a good investment for 10hp, but it is a bit much for plugs that are supposidly wearing out at 6-8k miles, thus costing alot in the long run.

ausie
08-01-2004, 03:02 PM
I have used the denso irridiums and have had good response with them. I went back to the standard type plug and notices a bit of sluggishness with then. Recently I decided to gap them to factory spec and noticed they did not work too good with an 0.052" gap. They worked best with an 0.045" gap. The concept is simple to understand that with a smaller electrode, the electical charge is concentrated on a smaller surface area. The build up in charge on the tip of the electrode is a function of time and the related surface area. Once the charge builds up the the threshold voltage you get the spark. The point (on the paper aspect of things) is that there is a reduction in time it takes to arch the gap as compared to a plug with a larger electode surface. Since the energy to create the the spark is time dependent and is relative to the surface area, it is possible to gain something in having more precision when the spark takes place (no time lag at higher RPM). There may be an advantage in the high RPM range but there is a disadvantage in the low end since the plug will trigger sooner. Its only a few miliseconds or so. It is all related to timming. If you understand issues with advance timming, not only are you adjusting when the spark will occur, you are also compensating the lag time it takes to create the spark.

More than likely with stock coils and a stock motor, there will not be any gains worthy of the extra cost of the plug. The only advantage would be with forced induction and high compression which would require a higher energy spark plug that would less likely suffer blow out.